I’m on the move!

Due to the restrictions with having a WordPress account I have decided to move to a self hosted blog.  Over the weekend Big Mr A has been working really hard to get me up and running and I think I am nearly there!  From now on all posts will be posted to my new site http://www.mummyoftwo.com.

The competition currently running can be entered through either site, the entries will all be counted!

If you are subscribed and enjoy reading my posts it would be great if you could follow me over to my new blog http://www.mummyoftwo.com.

Look forward to seeing you over there and I would love to hear your feedback on my new blog!

Many Thanks for your support!

badge

Advertisements

Tots 100 Printerpix Competition

Tots100 have teamed up with Printerpix to run a competition for bloggers to submit photos of their children/family to be in with chance of winning a brand new Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 bridge camera plus memory card, worth £500 – plus another £100 to spend on the Printerpix website.  4 runners up will receive a large framed photo or canvas print from Printerpix.

Here is my entry in the families category:

It was so hard to pick just 1 picture from our vast collection of digital pictures.  Since having our children we have taken thousands!

This picture was taken on a trip to Disney in Floria when Little Mr A was 9 months old.  We went with the whole family to celebrate my Mother-in-Law’s 60th birthday.  It was an amazing holiday, our first holiday abroad with Little Mr A and he loved it!  Although he was too young to take everything in he had a great time going on the rides and meeting the characters.

We had been queuing for some time to meet Mickey and Minnie and Little Mr A was really well behaved.  When it was our turn to meet them he had a great big smile on his face!  Shortly after this picture was taken Little Mr A became quite taken with Minnie and started nibbling her nose!

We are looking forward to hopefully returning in 2015 with Little Miss A!

This post is Mummy of Two’s entry into the Printerpix Photo competition.

Link

Updated Diary of a Newborn

Updated and with new video!

Guest Post – How to combat allergies in children


Allergies hit many people hard, but children seem to be especially vulnerable. That may be because most allergies first appear during infancy or childhood, and some later fade away by adulthood. But children aren’t just more susceptible to allergies because of their bodies. They’re more susceptible because of their growing minds and their active lifestyles, which put them into more regular contact with potential allergens. Whether it be food, pet or outdoor allergies, children have a harder time than adults coping with this problem. But there are steps you can take to make life easier and safer for your child.

Here are a few:


1. Keep Yourself and Your Child Informed

Learn everything you can about your child’s allergy. Share with your child whatever they are able to understand. Help them do some online research of their own. Encourage them to ask questions of their allergist, and make sure they understand everything the doctor tells you. Encourage them to talk to other students with allergies and learn what they do to cope and prepare. Stay up to date on new developments and medications.


2. Plan in Advance

Of course, it should go without saying, but take whatever steps are necessary to learn the cause of your child’s allergy. Then make a plan with the allergist and involve your child in every step. Get an EpiPen and keep it near your child at all times, whether that be in their pocket or with their teacher, depending on school policy. Stock up on other necessary prescriptions or over-the-counter medications. Practice with your child to make sure they know what to do in case of an attack.


3. Learn School’s Food Policies

Does your child’s school label foods that contain peanuts? Eggs? Dairy? Does the school keep EpiPens on hand for emergencies? Is the school generally considered to be allergy-conscious? Most schools are improving in their awareness of childhood allergy concerns, but some are much better than others. These schools train their staff for emergencies, have snack policies that limit interaction with dangerous foods, and segregate foods in the lunchroom that contain allergens.


4. Avoid Triggers

If your child is allergic to pets, don’t get any. If you already have one, keep it out of your child’s room at all times and try to keep it away from your child as much as possible. If the allergy is serious, you’ll have to give the pet away. If your child is allergic to dust mites, cover their crib or mattress with a mite-proof cover, remove stuffed animals, keep their room clean, get rid of carpets and heavy drapes. If it’s an outdoor allergy, use an air conditioner to filter allergens and keep windows closed. Wash their clothes and linens frequently. If indoor allergens are the culprit, get rid of household cleaners, perfumes and other strong chemicals, and ban all smoking (which you should really do under any circumstances if you have a child in the house).


5. Learn the Seasonal Patterns

If your child has an outdoor allergy, you’ll need to develop seasonal habits. Avoid the outdoors during high-pollination times, which will depend on when their particular allergen is in bloom – whether it be weeds, grasses or trees. Pollination is usually most intense between 5 a.m. and 10 a.m. Keep windows closed during these times. You may also want to run an air cleaner and keep pets from leaving or entering the house.
Allergies can take a hit out of anyone, but they’re especially hard on children. Whether it be food allergies, pet allergies or dust mite allergies, their bodies are vulnerable and their young minds aren’t well prepared to deal with the problem. But that’s why you’re there to help, and these tips can make the job a little easier.


Valerie Johnston is a health and fitness writer located in East Texas. With ambitions of one day running a marathon, writing for Healthline.com ensures she keeps up-to-date on all of the latest health and fitness news.

Star of the Day!

Image

Star of the Day!

Little Mr A got star of the day again today for all of his hard work!

Living with Hidradenitis Suppurativa

I have been umming and ahhing over whether to write this post for some time now.  Do I really want people to know about such a horrible condition I have?  Most of the time it makes me feel dirty and smelly, when I am not!  I came to the conclusion that most people that know me know about it anyway and for those that don’t it will explain why I don’t often wear vest tops, etc. in the summer and, if I do, why my armpits look such a mess!  If I can help someone else who is suffering and maybe doesn’t know what it is then that would be great.

So what is Hidradentis Suppurativa (HS)?  It is a painful, long-term skin condition that produces abscesses and consequently scarring to the skin, usually of the armpits, groin, buttocks and breasts, basically anywhere you can think of that is going to be (a) painful, (b) unsightly and (c) cause the most aggravation!  Lumps can also form elsewhere, I have a recurring one on my neck which, thankfully has not come back for a while.  Some poor people have them on their face and I am praying this never happens to me.  At least on your body you can hide them with clothes, no matter how painful, I cannot imagine having pus leaking lumps on your face.

At the moment there is no known cause for HS but it has been linked to inflamed sweat glands and blocked hair follicles.  It is estimated that around 1% of the population suffers, however, this could be more as it is quite an embarrassing condition to seek treatment for and therefore some people may not bother.  It has been featured on Embarrassing Bodies on a couple of occasions.

HS ranges from mild to severe.  At the moment, I am lucky and would say mine is more mild, however, from time to time it does flare up very badly and is incredibly painful.  I can’t remember the last time I was completely symptom free!

The symptoms include red lumps, blackheads, cysts, scarring and channels in the skin which leak pus.  Sometimes these lumps can become infected which cause an infection requiring treatment with antibiotics.

There are 3 distinct stages to the disease and, unfortunately, at present, no cure.  These stages are as follows:

  • Stage 1 – single or a few isolated abscesses without scarring or sinus tracts.
  • Stage 2 – recurrent abscesses in more than one area and the beginning of the formation of sinus tracts.
  • Stage 3 – widespread abscesses with many interconnected sinus tracts under the skin. There may be severe scarring and continuous leaking.

HS usually starts around the age of puberty, but it can appear at any age.  It is less common for HS to occur before puberty or after the menopause, leading some experts to believe that hormones have some sort of influence on the disease.  I am absolutely convinced my HS is hormone related.  I only vaguely remember having light symptoms before I became pregnant with Little Mr A.  Whilst I was pregnant all of the symptoms disappeared.  As soon as I had had Little Mr A the symptoms came back worse than ever. I did seek medical assistance at this point but the only thing they would offer me were really strong antibiotics and I wasn’t allowed to get pregnant whilst on them or for 6 months to a year after finishing them as it could seriously affect a baby.  At the time we were considering another child and therefore I put up with the symptoms.  When I became pregnant with Little Miss A, again, my symptoms all but disappeared.  Since giving birth this time, I have gone back on the pill and my symptoms do not seem to have come back so bad, however, around ‘that time of the month’ they do worsen.  The Doctors never seemed convinced it was hormone related, however, I think all the evidence in my case strongly suggests hormones are to blame.

HS can run in the family and I really hope I have not passed this horrible disease onto either of my children I really do not want them to have to suffer with it.

It is said that smoking and being overweight can make HS worse so it is recommended that you lose weight and stop smoking to see if there is any improvement.  I cannot say for definite that giving up smoking has helped mine, but, I have not started again since having Little Miss A and, as I said before, my symptoms are not too bad at the moment.

In the early stages, the disease may be controlled with medication, however, I was constantly on and off antibiotics in the early days and, whenever my course finished, the symptoms would return!  Persistent and severe cases may require surgery.  I was offered steroid injections into affected areas, however, I could not face having injections into my armpits, particularly when they were already painful from the lumps!

I have learnt to live with HS over the years.  Yes it’s still painful and embarrassing and, no matter how hard I try, sometimes it does really get me down and I think ‘why me’?  It is especially frustrating in the summer when I want to wear strappy tops.  Somedays I cannot shave my armpits it is so painful and I just don’t feel comfortable having that on show!  Even at home, if I wear a strappy top, Little Mr A now notices and will not come for a cuddle unless I put another top on to cover it up.  That really hurts.

Whenever symptoms are really bad and I am feeling upset I do try and pull myself out of it. It is not a life threatening illness it is just frustrating and painful and I know things could be a lot worse.

For more information please visit the NHS website.  For support there are various help groups and websites such as The Hidradenitis Suppurativa Trust and even a Facebook group.

I am not brave enough to put any pictures of my horrible skin on here, but, if you want to see what it looks like there are plenty of images if you search on Google!

I’m a Babyhuddle Elite Blogger!

This week I was thrilled to be accepted as a Babyhuddle Elite Blogger.  In order to apply I had to submit a guest post.  I decided to write one about children’s TV.  If you haven’t already seen it, why not check it out, I’d love your comments!

2012 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 1,900 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 3 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

A rare moment of Little Miss A being awake and actually wanting to play! – 8 weeks and 2 days

Video

Updated – Diary of a newborn

Me and 'Ted Ted'

Me and ‘Ted Ted’

Please check out the updated diary of Little Miss A!

Thanks!